August262013
My Oma’s giant sunflower yhats already seeding. She doesnt ev3n plant these, the birds carry them from the bird feeder.

My Oma’s giant sunflower yhats already seeding. She doesnt ev3n plant these, the birds carry them from the bird feeder.

June22013
Big Leaf Maple
Acer Macrophyla
Paddles, sore throats, internal medicine lots of other things not mentioned in my notes.
Huge glorious leaves. This picture just does not do the beauty and magnificence of this tree. When we first started taking about this plant, it was flowering. I wish I had the pictures of that still, maybe I’ll scan my flashcard someday, but it’s such a huge growth difference between the two pictures.

Big Leaf Maple

Acer Macrophyla

  • Paddles, sore throats, internal medicine lots of other things not mentioned in my notes.

Huge glorious leaves. This picture just does not do the beauty and magnificence of this tree. When we first started taking about this plant, it was flowering. I wish I had the pictures of that still, maybe I’ll scan my flashcard someday, but it’s such a huge growth difference between the two pictures.

June12013
There’s some Salmon Berry berries!

There’s some Salmon Berry berries!

May312013
By process of elimination, this has to be Nootka Rose…
Nootka Rose
Rosa Nutkana
I’ve made rose hip jam from this stuff, but that was with dried rose hips that were gathered by someone else. I haven’t spent a lot of time with this plant, and honestly I confuse it with Oregon Grape whenever I first encounter it, even though Oregon Grape is… pokier.
I think I have this in my front yard, so I’m going to watch it all summer to see what it does.

By process of elimination, this has to be Nootka Rose…

Nootka Rose

Rosa Nutkana

I’ve made rose hip jam from this stuff, but that was with dried rose hips that were gathered by someone else. I haven’t spent a lot of time with this plant, and honestly I confuse it with Oregon Grape whenever I first encounter it, even though Oregon Grape is… pokier.

I think I have this in my front yard, so I’m going to watch it all summer to see what it does.

May302013

Pacific Rhododendron

Rhododendron Macrophyllum

The first picture is taken outside my front door in western Washington. Rhododendrons are the Washington state flower, and they are planted in a lot of landscapes as ornamental. They come in other colors, but the pink ones are supposed to be the original.

They don’t really have a use besides ornamental, for the bees, and also they’re poisonous. No eating.

May292013

Salmon Berry

Rubus Spectabilis

More edible berries. These pictures show flowering. The petals are actually edible too, and can be picked without stopping the formation of the berry as long as the center remains in tact. They have a nice sweet flavor and would likely taste good on a salad.

When we were little my mom used to take us to the Puyallup River in Orting, WA and we’d pick blackberries. One year she got really excited because we’d found some salmon berries there too. So I always associate them with my mom and that river.

The berries are starting to form now, and some are even ripe, though most are still green/light orange.

May282013

Thimbleberry

Rubus Parviflorus

  • Edible Berry

The berries on this one are just starting to form. I think they get ripe after the Salmon Berry does, if I remember correctly. We talk about living on “plant time” in Ethnobotany, which is knowing when things ripen/come into season based on what we see from other plants. It’s something we also talked about in “Honoring the Gift of Food” which was a traditional foods class I took my first quarter. It spreads into knowing that it’s time to fish for salmon or time to participate in other food preparation/gathering activities based on what plants are sprouting, blooming, or ripening.

I have to take more pictures after the berries ripen.

May272013

Western Trumpet Honeysuckle

Lonicera Ciliosa

  • Stems used for weaving

Missing most of my notes on this one. So from memory: Children suck on the flowers? But the rest of the plant is poisonous. This one elicited an “omg its so pretty” from almost my whole class.

6AM
I made a plant blog b/c I’ve been taking pictures of plants during classes all quarter and the lady sitting next to me leans over and whispers “You should put those on FB” and I prefer Tumblr so TA DA.
This is my avatar picture for this blog, and it is my Goddess Plant; Stinging Nettle - Urtica Dioica. It’s so beautiful. I get excited whenever I’m near it. I took this near the Muckleshoot Tribal College in western Washington.
I’ll post most of the pictures I’ve been taking, and more pictures I take, as well as notes from class about uses for the plants. I’m also interested in stories people have about plants, and other names for plants in different languages.
One story I have about stinging nettle is that when we were little, my sisters and I used to live near a creek. There was a hillside covered in stinging nettle and we would have to climb down it to get to the creek. One time my sister slipped and fell head first into that stinging nettle patch, and she spent a miserable few days in the bathtub applying topical medicines that didn’t really help her feel better. She thinks I’m crazy to gather it, eat it, dry it, and love it.
Nettle sting, though, is actually a reliever of arthritis, and if you sting yourself enough times it doesn’t hurt so much as numb the stung area. I have so much to say about nettle, I’ll probably make multiple posts about it. (I also tend to take lots of pictures of it…)

I made a plant blog b/c I’ve been taking pictures of plants during classes all quarter and the lady sitting next to me leans over and whispers “You should put those on FB” and I prefer Tumblr so TA DA.

This is my avatar picture for this blog, and it is my Goddess Plant; Stinging Nettle - Urtica Dioica. It’s so beautiful. I get excited whenever I’m near it. I took this near the Muckleshoot Tribal College in western Washington.

I’ll post most of the pictures I’ve been taking, and more pictures I take, as well as notes from class about uses for the plants. I’m also interested in stories people have about plants, and other names for plants in different languages.

One story I have about stinging nettle is that when we were little, my sisters and I used to live near a creek. There was a hillside covered in stinging nettle and we would have to climb down it to get to the creek. One time my sister slipped and fell head first into that stinging nettle patch, and she spent a miserable few days in the bathtub applying topical medicines that didn’t really help her feel better. She thinks I’m crazy to gather it, eat it, dry it, and love it.

Nettle sting, though, is actually a reliever of arthritis, and if you sting yourself enough times it doesn’t hurt so much as numb the stung area. I have so much to say about nettle, I’ll probably make multiple posts about it. (I also tend to take lots of pictures of it…)

6AM
Trembling/Quaking Aspen
Populus Tremuloides

Gum from buds used to treat baldness, sore throats, whooping cough, and tuberculosis.
Wood used to smoke fish
I remember my instructor mentioning something about these trees being associated with ghosts because of the way they move with the slightest breeze. They sound a little like rain, and that makes me happy.

Trembling/Quaking Aspen

Populus Tremuloides

  • Gum from buds used to treat baldness, sore throats, whooping cough, and tuberculosis.
  • Wood used to smoke fish

I remember my instructor mentioning something about these trees being associated with ghosts because of the way they move with the slightest breeze. They sound a little like rain, and that makes me happy.

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